What's cooking today? 🔥 Pics are necessary!

(bottom pic)40 lbs of corned beef for an event today. This was the last one because I almost forgot the obligatory pics. LOL

The top one is from my test cook last week. Glad I did one because it was way too salty and needed a longer soaking with more water changes. Worked well in a potato soup though.
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(bottom pic)40 lbs of corned beef for an event today. This was the last one because I almost forgot the obligatory pics. LOL

The top one is from my test cook last week. Glad I did one because it was way too salty and needed a longer soaking with more water changes. Worked well in a potato soup though.View attachment 23221View attachment 23220
Color is great, too bad about the salinity. Looks like you got a good and complete brine.
I was using different wet brines and had various results in regard to salt levels in the end product. I started using an equilibrium dry brine for my corned beef recipe. Now i don't have any issues with the salinity in the end. As long as the calculations are done correctly, it turns out perfectly every time.
Screenshot_20240318_045125_Excel.jpg
This is done in grams as it's easier to get more accurate calculations. Use the total amount of weight of the meat in kilograms and then multiply it by the value per kilogram on each ingredient.
Coat the meat well with all the dry brine, put it in a vacuum bag or ziploc bag with all the dry brine and put it in the fridge. Turn it daily and 'roll/massage' the meat when you do. To calculate the dry brine time, measure the thickest part of the meat in inches. Multiply x 4 and then add 2 days. (4" thick would be 18 days). This rule of thumb works well to ensure you done have that uncured gray center.
When done, rinse and you can go to cooking. You can soak it if you want and would like a lighter salinity to the meat.
Cook it now as corned beef, or move on to making it into pastrami
With the equilibrium brine calculated correctly the over salting won't happen. I use an equilibrium dry brine for my bacon as well now. Never have a salt issue. I am salt sensitive, so I don't enjoy heavily salted profiles in meats.
 
I see the PimpMyGrill grates. Is this your first cook with them?
No but first rib cook


Did you spritz your ribs during the cook? You can keep the thinner parts of the ribs from overcooking by spritzing that end more heavily.
I don't like opening my door often and spraying shit in there. Recover time is too long on a Traeger.
I'll just go back to a wrap step, probably not a long one though. I like dryer skin, just not dry meat, so I gotta find what works for me I guess.
In my old smokers, never had a rib fail, this moving air thing is something I need to account for. I had a thick skin on these ribs, Traeger skins every meat, which is good in most cases, hold that moisture.

I had 3 racks I was gonna do and experiment with all three, 2 of them stunk bad when I cut the vac pack open. I refused to cook them even though they weren't "expired".
 
Baby back ribs. I started on 225 with super smoke . Lumberjack Hickory in the hopper and Cookin’ Pellets.com Perfect Mix in a pellet tube. I always keep track of time but cook to temp.

4 hours unwrapped with mustard binder and Goldees All Purpose Rub

Temp of ribs in between bones was 164

Pulled and wrapped with Wells Vinegar as my liquid in foil

Kept temp at 225 with foil for hour and checked rib temp again… only 169 ? WTH?

Re wrapped and bumped grill temp to 300 for 45 minutes

Rib temp was 205

Unwrapped and Sauced with Goldees for about 15 - 20 minutes

This was a LONG rib cook for me. Windy, northern Alabama and about 48 degrees it usually doesn’t take this long. I checked temp with Thermapen One
 

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Last night I did a solid frozen prime sirloin from Costco. Hockey puck solid. It was about 1.25 - 1.5 “ thick. I put the sirloin 100% frozen on the TRAEGER for about 90 minutes at 200 degrees. Zero seasoning, zero thawing and zero oil on the steak. It still had the white ice coat on it. I had Lumberjack Oak in the hopper and pellet tube.

I pulled the steak at 115 degrees internal temperature and THEN SEASONED it with a little olive oil, SPG and O (salt pepper garlic onion) I mix my own. I said 90 minutes above however , I NEVER cook by time but I always keep track of time. I split whatever my salt portion/ content/ % equally with Diamond Crystal Kosher and Lawreys season salt. 16 mesh black pepper.

I let that sit on the steak until I heat my pan up.

PRO TIP # 1 ALWAYS heat your cast iron pan up FIRST for about 10-15 minutes THEN add oil/ butter/ both. It prevents scorching the butter or oil.

PRO TIP # 2. If you add a little oil such as high heat olive oil to your butter it will increase the smoke point of your butter. Or add a little butter to your olive oil for another layer of flavor…. The oil will prevent the butter from smoking within a reasonable temp setting on your stovetop.

I finished it in a cast iron pan with olive oil, a little butter, fresh garlic and onions.

Conduction cooktop for me. Your approx time to temp will vary. I never cook by time. I always keep track of time but I never use it as my guide. I use my Thermapen One to monitor. Could use a Meater here but I chose not to.

Flipped after about 5 minutes on med low heat. About another 5 on the other side until internal temp read 128. Rested under oil for 15 minutes.

My conduction cooktop goes from 1-9 and I pan sear my steak on the 4 setting for a reference.


RESULTS

I will NEVER THAW my steaks again.
I might actually freeze my steaks prior to cooking them as long as they are Prime Grade I believe the frozen steak slows the cook down to where the fat could FULLY RENDER. Not sure how a Select or Choice Grade would work.


Heck, the frozen steak might be a Traeger Sous Vide 😂😂😂😂
 

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Last edited:
Color is great, too bad about the salinity. Looks like you got a good and complete brine.
I was using different wet brines and had various results in regard to salt levels in the end product. I started using an equilibrium dry brine for my corned beef recipe. Now i don't have any issues with the salinity in the end. As long as the calculations are done correctly, it turns out perfectly every time.
View attachment 23224
This is done in grams as it's easier to get more accurate calculations. Use the total amount of weight of the meat in kilograms and then multiply it by the value per kilogram on each ingredient.
Coat the meat well with all the dry brine, put it in a vacuum bag or ziploc bag with all the dry brine and put it in the fridge. Turn it daily and 'roll/massage' the meat when you do. To calculate the dry brine time, measure the thickest part of the meat in inches. Multiply x 4 and then add 2 days. (4" thick would be 18 days). This rule of thumb works well to ensure you done have that uncured gray center.
When done, rinse and you can go to cooking. You can soak it if you want and would like a lighter salinity to the meat.
Cook it now as corned beef, or move on to making it into pastrami
With the equilibrium brine calculated correctly the over salting won't happen. I use an equilibrium dry brine for my bacon as well now. Never have a salt issue. I am salt sensitive, so I don't enjoy heavily salted profiles in meats.
@RustyJake ,

Thanks for the detailed instructions; I can’t wait to try it out. Question: what cut of meat do you start with? Brisket Flat?
-PH
 
@RustyJake ,

Thanks for the detailed instructions; I can’t wait to try it out. Question: what cut of meat do you start with? Brisket Flat?
-PH
I have used just the flat, and just the point but mainly i do a whole packer brisket. If you want all lean or a fattier meat, just select.the flat or point. I found expandable vacuum bags on Amazon, so doing a whole brisket isn't an issue.
I am going to do a sirloin roast in the near future and make pastrami with it. Bigger slices for lunch meats. You could corn any beef roast.
 
Last night I did a solid frozen prime sirloin from Costco. Hockey puck solid. It was about 1.25 - 1.5 “ thick. I put the sirloin 100% frozen on the TRAEGER for about 90 minutes at 200 degrees. Zero seasoning, zero thawing and zero oil on the steak. It still had the white ice coat on it. I had Lumberjack Oak in the hopper and pellet tube.

I pulled the steak at 115 degrees internal temperature and THEN SEASONED it with a little olive oil, SPG and O (salt pepper garlic onion) I mix my own. I said 90 minutes above however , I NEVER cook by time but I always keep track of time. I split whatever my salt portion/ content/ % equally with Diamond Crystal Kosher and Lawreys season salt. 16 mesh black pepper.

I let that sit on the steak until I heat my pan up.

PRO TIP # 1 ALWAYS heat your cast iron pan up FIRST for about 10-15 minutes THEN add oil/ butter/ both. It prevents scorching the butter or oil.

PRO TIP # 2. If you add a little oil such as high heat olive oil to your butter it will increase the smoke point of your butter. Or add a little butter to your olive oil for another layer of flavor…. The oil will prevent the butter from smoking within a reasonable temp setting on your stovetop.

I finished it in a cast iron pan with olive oil, a little butter, fresh garlic and onions.

Conduction cooktop for me. Your approx time to temp will vary. I never cook by time. I always keep track of time but I never use it as my guide. I use my Thermapen One to monitor. Could use a Meater here but I chose not to.

Flipped after about 5 minutes on med low heat. About another 5 on the other side until internal temp read 128. Rested under oil for 15 minutes.

My conduction cooktop goes from 1-9 and I pan sear my steak on the 4 setting for a reference.


RESULTS

I will NEVER THAW my steaks again.
I might actually freeze my steaks prior to cooking them as long as they are Prime Grade I believe the frozen steak slows the cook down to where the fat could FULLY RENDER. Not sure how a Select or Choice Grade would work.


Heck, the frozen steak might be a Traeger Sous Vide 😂😂😂😂
I’ll have to give it a try, I bought several of those from Costco a while back, they haven’t had any lately. But I put them frozen in my Sous Vide then sear. Really good steaks. The flavor really does come from the perfect searing as you describe.
 
Put a 2 hour smoke on some 1/2 lb burgers for lunch today.
IMG_6513.jpeg
 
Color is great, too bad about the salinity. Looks like you got a good and complete brine.
I was using different wet brines and had various results in regard to salt levels in the end product. I started using an equilibrium dry brine for my corned beef recipe. Now i don't have any issues with the salinity in the end. As long as the calculations are done correctly, it turns out perfectly every time.
View attachment 23224
This is done in grams as it's easier to get more accurate calculations. Use the total amount of weight of the meat in kilograms and then multiply it by the value per kilogram on each ingredient.
Coat the meat well with all the dry brine, put it in a vacuum bag or ziploc bag with all the dry brine and put it in the fridge. Turn it daily and 'roll/massage' the meat when you do. To calculate the dry brine time, measure the thickest part of the meat in inches. Multiply x 4 and then add 2 days. (4" thick would be 18 days). This rule of thumb works well to ensure you done have that uncured gray center.
When done, rinse and you can go to cooking. You can soak it if you want and would like a lighter salinity to the meat.
Cook it now as corned beef, or move on to making it into pastrami
With the equilibrium brine calculated correctly the over salting won't happen. I use an equilibrium dry brine for my bacon as well now. Never have a salt issue. I am salt sensitive, so I don't enjoy heavily salted profiles in meats.
ok @RustyJake Another coupe of questions: When I get a Corned Beef from the grocery it usually has a flavor packet with it, that is just pickling spices. I like to boil my CB on the stove top with the pickling spices for a couple of hours (depending on the size) then finish it in the oven for an hour covered. I think the boiling adds to the favor, where the oven cooking adds to the tenderness. I'll put a cup or two of the boiling water in the pan when it goes into the oven to keep it moist. A tight foil wrap is required!

When yours comes out of the fridge from brining I'll rinse it and then probably do the same boil (with a tablespoon or two of McCormicks pickling spices) and follow my same procedure. Sound good? Or do you think the pickling spice will be "too much" since it sat in your brine?

PS: Where do you just get your brine from ? I see it available on the web - I just don't recall seeing it in the grocery. Spice Isle?

Thanks again,
-PH
 
ok @RustyJake Another coupe of questions: When I get a Corned Beef from the grocery it usually has a flavor packet with it, that is just pickling spices. I like to boil my CB on the stove top with the pickling spices for a couple of hours (depending on the size) then finish it in the oven for an hour covered. I think the boiling adds to the favor, where the oven cooking adds to the tenderness. I'll put a cup or two of the boiling water in the pan when it goes into the oven to keep it moist. A tight foil wrap is required!

When yours comes out of the fridge from brining I'll rinse it and then probably do the same boil (with a tablespoon or two of McCormicks pickling spices) and follow my same procedure. Sound good? Or do you think the pickling spice will be "too much" since it sat in your brine?

PS: Where do you just get your brine from ? I see it available on the web - I just don't recall seeing it in the grocery. Spice Isle?

Thanks again,
-PH
You can buy prepared pickling spices, or use your own ingredients and make something up.
Pickling spice is easy to find, so I usually just grab a bag and have it around and throw it in when boiling the corned beef.
For pastrami I use a copycat Katz deli rub mixture from Meathead's site. He has a good recipe that is nicely seasoned.
The brine recipe that is posted above and is made from using spices bought from the grocery store. We have a bulk barn store up here that carries bulk spices so I can get what I need. But some stuff I bought from Amazon.
The recipe in this post is based on weight in kilograms. You will use the total weight (in kgs), and multiply that by the value in the gms/kg column for each unit. That will provide you with the exact amount of each to ensure that the meat is spiced and salted perfectly. You will need a decent kitchen scale that measures in grams.
The only way to ensure it is properly brined at the right levels of spice and salt is to use the ratio of ingredients based on the weight of you protein.
 
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