Smoking vs Roasting Chicken

Philvt11

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Hi,

I recently got an Ironwood 650 and have had great success so far. One question is have is what's the best way to cook a whole chicken? Some recipes say 225 the whole way and others say 375 the whole way. I don't want the leathery skin texture and would like it crispy so if you have tips on which way to cook it I that would be great.
 

Timmy

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I smoke chickens this last weekend. Put rub on them cooked at 230 to 250 for 4 hrs or so.
 

PriceMP5

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I’ve found that when I cook chicken below 300 the skin tends to turn out more rubbery while when I cook a chicken at 375 the skin always comes out great
 

traeger860

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Beer can chickens come out great in the Traeger. 350 for about an hour.
 

traeger860

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IronMike

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Hi,

I recently got an Ironwood 650 and have had great success so far. One question is have is what's the best way to cook a whole chicken? Some recipes say 225 the whole way and others say 375 the whole way. I don't want the leathery skin texture and would like it crispy so if you have tips on which way to cook it I that would be great.
Brine 'em and spatchcock 'em. 220 with supersmoke if you have it then just go off the probe.
 

traeger860

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Not convinced that beer can chicken actually works. I always have the same amount of beer in the stand as when I start? This guy debunks it https://youtube.be/6oiXjb-7BY

The YouTube link didn't work. Whatever you start with should steam and flavor the chicken from the inside. And some of the moisture and juices from the chicken ends up falling into the container. So even though I also end up with close to the same amount of liquid at the end, the makeup of that liquid definitely isn't how it started.
 

RustyJake

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The YouTube link didn't work. Whatever you start with should steam and flavor the chicken from the inside. And some of the moisture and juices from the chicken ends up falling into the container. So even though I also end up with close to the same amount of liquid at the end, the makeup of that liquid definitely isn't how it started.
The video link is more than likely Meathead's Google presentation. He draws some information based on basic science and the way heat energy works. His points make sense, but so does the success of so many people using the beer can method. Hard to argue both sides...it's like fat up, or fat down which he also covers in that speech.
He discusses using a can of beer and covering it with a cold chicken, wjich only acts to insulate the beer from the heat (I personally think that the beer would be affected from heat from below, so insulation isn't a big factor). In his discussion he says the beer never gets hot enough to impart moisture in the bird, because the chicken will be cooked before that happens. If I was to do this method again, I would probably preheat the can of beer to the point of steaming
I don't know if he's right or wrong, don't really care. It is a method of cooking that has to have some realm of legitimacy because its been around for years.
 

Jacob_Sausalito

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I spatchcock the chicken and rub it down with Traeger Chicken Rub. Then cook on Grill Grates at 375 for 45 - 75 minutes depending on the size of the chicken. Skin comes out super crispy meat is juicy as long as you don't overcook. Everyone loves them.
 

Blip

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I spatchcock the chicken and rub it down with Traeger Chicken Rub. Then cook on Grill Grates at 375 for 45 - 75 minutes depending on the size of the chicken. Skin comes out super crispy meat is juicy as long as you don't overcook. Everyone loves them.
Do you flip the chicken during the cook or just leave it skin up or down? I cook skin down on the plancha side at 500 about 4-5 minutes till skin browns and crisps then lower the temp to 425 and flip and place on the regular grate till done.
 

Jacob_Sausalito

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I do the whole cook on the Grill Grates. I start skin side up - this dries out the skin. Then after 15 - 20 minutes I flip it skin side down. Cook until I get the skin to the color I want and then flip it back to skin side up. Keep it on until the temperature hits 160 (rises to 165 while it rests). Works for me every time. Best of luck. Jacob
 

jp9724

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My chicken seems to turn out well, i dont brine as dont feel its needed. I smoke at 180f for an hour and turn up to 350f till its finished. Loads of flavor, juice, crispy skin and a nice smoke ring. Turkey ill brine just due to a longer smoke and roasting time its more likely to dry out.
 

phatracer

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The video link is more than likely Meathead's Google presentation. He draws some information based on basic science and the way heat energy works. His points make sense, but so does the success of so many people using the beer can method. Hard to argue both sides...it's like fat up, or fat down which he also covers in that speech.
He discusses using a can of beer and covering it with a cold chicken, wjich only acts to insulate the beer from the heat (I personally think that the beer would be affected from heat from below, so insulation isn't a big factor). In his discussion he says the beer never gets hot enough to impart moisture in the bird, because the chicken will be cooked before that happens. If I was to do this method again, I would probably preheat the can of beer to the point of steaming
I don't know if he's right or wrong, don't really care. It is a method of cooking that has to have some realm of legitimacy because its been around for years.
RustyJake,

Thanks for the explanation. Makes sense to me. The other thing I was thinking about is the drip tray gets hot as hell, so perhaps preheating the beer as you said, and the heat from the drip tray on the bottom of the throne would allow it to steam?
 

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I do think a covered gas grill might heat the beer can better than a pellet grill?
 

Slimpicker

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I do think a covered gas grill might heat the beer can better than a pellet grill?
I do... but for a Traeger I say heat the beer first... actually I've used different liquids besides beer... water and pickling spices with a squirt of lemon juice, for this I boil first.
 

RustyJake

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Convenience, the gas grill is probably easiest. If you are cooking at 350 in either a pellet or gas grill, isn't that still 350? Given that the Traeger has a convection design, it may be different. I just hadn't thought of one being better for cooking at a specific temperature. Maybe I am missing something on that?
I do think the liquid should be heated to effectively work in the concept the beer can method is designed for. The liquid would need to be close to boiling 212°F to start vaporizing and give off moisture to impart flavor and moisture to the bird. If you don't give that liquid a head start, the chicken is done well below that temperature.
Regardless of which grill is used, I think that heating the liquid would be necessary for this method to have a better effect on the cook.
Full disclosure, I haven't done one of these for years. Maybe I need to try again.
 

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