Pro 780 temp issues

shelderman

New member
Joined
Jun 21, 2022
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
23059
Grill
Pro 780
I've so far cooked ribs and a pork butt. The issue I've had with both is, I follow the instructions to a T but the internal meat rises veryyy slowly according to the cooking timeline. So I keep having to raise the temp to almost 100 above the instruction temp.

For example on my butt, I had to raise to 275 to get the butt to 160 within 5 hrs. But after that it wouldn't rise above 160, after 1.5 hrs. So I had to keeping raising until 350 to get it to 205 in under 10 hrs.

This was on a 9lb butt.

Is the temp guage bad? Any suggestions? Is this common?
 

JPSBBQ

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2021
Messages
380
Reaction score
348
Points
63
Location
Illinois
Grill
Tailgater,Ranger,Ironwood 885, Timberine 850 &1300
I've so far cooked ribs and a pork butt. The issue I've had with both is, I follow the instructions to a T but the internal meat rises veryyy slowly according to the cooking timeline. So I keep having to raise the temp to almost 100 above the instruction temp.

For example on my butt, I had to raise to 275 to get the butt to 160 within 5 hrs. But after that it wouldn't rise above 160, after 1.5 hrs. So I had to keeping raising until 350 to get it to 205 in under 10 hrs.

This was on a 9lb butt.

Is the temp guage bad? Any suggestions? Is this common?
It’s called the stall. At @160 the connective tissue and fat start to break down and it’s like the meat is sweating. Just like if you sweat, it has a cooling effect. You either have to wait a long time til you get in the mid 180’s or you can wrap the protein and it will steam and power through the stall in a much more predictable manner. I recommend foil for anyone starting out as it is the most forgiving and predictable. You can also raise the temperature in conjunction with the wrap to make things go even quicker. Happy Traegering!
 

fpottle

New member
Joined
May 22, 2022
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Sevenoaks, United Kingdom
Grill
Timberline 850
I've so far cooked ribs and a pork butt. The issue I've had with both is, I follow the instructions to a T but the internal meat rises veryyy slowly according to the cooking timeline. So I keep having to raise the temp to almost 100 above the instruction temp.

For example on my butt, I had to raise to 275 to get the butt to 160 within 5 hrs. But after that it wouldn't rise above 160, after 1.5 hrs. So I had to keeping raising until 350 to get it to 205 in under 10 hrs.

This was on a 9lb butt.

Is the temp guage bad? Any suggestions? Is this common?
I would personally recommend that you go through a rigorous calibration process.

I have a Timberline 850 and after a couple of months’ ownership I came to doubt the internal temperature reading.

I got out my InkBird 6 probe Bluetooth kit and my ThermoPen and made sure that they were al in-sync in water at ~120. Once I was sure that these 7 probes were roughly equivalent, I moved to my Traeger and tested the air temp on all 3 racks (incl. changes to from to back positions) only to find:

A) My Traeger’s internal probe was reading 11F too high.

B) The temperature difference between high and low shoves was about 20F.

So, I would suggest (if you don’t have them already), get a loan of alternative probes and work out (as I did) that the internal temp is lower than the internal probe shows (~10 lower).

If I’m reading your post right, I think you may have a low reading on your internal probe - leading to long cooking times.
 

JPSBBQ

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2021
Messages
380
Reaction score
348
Points
63
Location
Illinois
Grill
Tailgater,Ranger,Ironwood 885, Timberine 850 &1300
I would personally recommend that you go through a rigorous calibration process.

I have a Timberline 850 and after a couple of months’ ownership I came to doubt the internal temperature reading.

I got out my InkBird 6 probe Bluetooth kit and my ThermoPen and made sure that they were al in-sync in water at ~120. Once I was sure that these 7 probes were roughly equivalent, I moved to my Traeger and tested the air temp on all 3 racks (incl. changes to from to back positions) only to find:

A) My Traeger’s internal probe was reading 11F too high.

B) The temperature difference between high and low shoves was about 20F.

So, I would suggest (if you don’t have them already), get a loan of alternative probes and work out (as I did) that the internal temp is lower than the internal probe shows (~10 lower).

If I’m reading your post right, I think you may have a low reading on your internal probe - leading to long cooking times.
It’s called “the stall” perfectly normal.
 

Latest Discussions

Top