Beef Can you smoke a pot roast?

Daba's BBQ

Active member
Joined
Jun 29, 2021
Messages
82
Reaction score
106
Points
33
Location
Metro NYC
Grill
Pit Boss Pro Series 850
I just picked up a beautiful 6-pound pot roast. Like you guys, I've smoked almost everything, but never a pot roast.

I'm sure it can be done, but I would like some suggestions so I don't kill it :)

Thanks
 
I smokem like a brisket, but I pay more attention to the internal temp and wrap in foil with a little liquid. You can also smokem for a while thin put them in a pan covered in foil with liquid and braze them.
 
Interesting that you could it like a brisket, never thought of that. Here is what I'm thinking...
  • Season roast
  • 2 hours at 250
  • Transfer to dutch oven - add beef broth, veggies and cover
  • Bump up temp to 275-300
  • Braise for several hours until IT hits optimal temp
Thoughts?
 
Interesting that you could it like a brisket, never thought of that. Here is what I'm thinking...
  • Season roast
  • 2 hours at 250
  • Transfer to dutch oven - add beef broth, veggies and cover
  • Bump up temp to 275-300
  • Braise for several hours until IT hits optimal temp
Thoughts?
Sounds like you got a real good plan! 💯
 
I've smoked chuck roasts, London broil, eye of round, top round, top sirloin, etc. Technically, its not a "Pot Rast" unless it is cooked in a pot, but there is no need to get technical. The tougher the cut of meat, the longer the roast needs to cook to make it tender. After the first couple of hours in the smoke, the roast won't pick up much more smoke so you can place it in a Dutch oven, place it in a roasting pan and then cover it with foil, or wrap it in foil or butcher wrap for the final part of the cook. For tough cuts like eye of round, adding liquid so it can steam for a few hours will help make it more tender. Whether you add vegetables is entirely up to you.

Sometimes I have cooked the roast in the Traeger and then cut it into cubes to go into a pot for final cooking along with potatoes, carrots and celery to make a beef stew. Smoking the roast first add a lot of extra flavor.
 
Not sure if you've cooked it yet or not but sounds like two different things going on here. If your original question is can you prepare a "pot roast" on the smoker...Are you asking if you can cook it similar to like you do in a crockpot, with the vegies etc., sure no reason you can't.

What others are talking about is just cooking a good old chuck rust similar to a brisket. I do it all the time. I season and smoke at 225 until it reaches around 155-160. Then wrap, raise the temps to around 275 and let it go until its around 203-205. I rest it for a half hour or so but it has the same texture as a brisket, something you slice and eat, not falling apart like a traditional "pot roast".

If you go to youtube you will find hundreds of videos for smoking a chuck roast.
 
Are you asking if you can cook it similar to like you do in a crockpot, with the vegies etc., sure no reason you can't
I think he meant just the meat first...
  • Season roast
  • 2 hours at 250
  • Transfer to dutch oven - add beef broth, veggies and cover
  • Bump up temp to 275-300
  • Braise for several hours until IT hits optimal temp
 
Perfect cook

The temp was rock solid at 250 for 5+ hours. The temp probe was spot on. Pulled at 203, let it rest for an hour.
 

Attachments

  • 20240224_144355.jpg
    20240224_144355.jpg
    309.3 KB · Views: 14
  • 20240224_144228.jpg
    20240224_144228.jpg
    266.5 KB · Views: 14
  • 20240223_184743.jpg
    20240223_184743.jpg
    256.3 KB · Views: 13
  • 20240223_184505.jpg
    20240223_184505.jpg
    155.5 KB · Views: 14
  • 20240223_184500.jpg
    20240223_184500.jpg
    145.9 KB · Views: 13
I used the Smoked Pot Roast recipe from the Traeger app and it came out very nice.
 
I found an absolutely beautiful 4.8# chuck roast at the farm where we started buying our meats. I'm going to give this a go this week. I'm assuming I can do a same-day cook - probably starting around 8:00 AM - opposed to the overnight cooks I do for a 13+ lb brisket.Thanks for sharing the HeyGrill link - I'll probably do something similar, but start closer to 180 for the first couple of hours (lower temp is generally better for smoke on my 780), probably with a smoke tube too. Then I'll bump to 250 after a couple of hours once it's in a foil pan.

Questions:
  1. Do you think injecting it will help? Normally a chuck is plenty fatty/juicy, but I thought it could be a nice way to introduce more flavor, instead of just spritzing it.
  2. Do you guys pull/chop it for sandwiches or serve it as a dinner (sliced/chunked). I know slicing a chuck/pot-roast won't look as pretty as a sliced brisket, but it should eat good. If it turns out well, I could do a chopped/pulled version this summer for bbq sammies.

-PH
 
Back
Top